Where We Live

I’ve been helping someone search for a new and more convenient city / state to live in because they are now travelling the country in their job. Right now, she has to drive to Charleston, SC or Myrtle Beach, SC, to catch a flight to a large airport hub such as Charlotte, NC, or Atlanta, GA, and then proceed to her final destination. This causes a nasty little layover that is not only a waste of time, but is also quite frustrating when repeated twice weekly.

Charlotte Douglas International Airport (CLT) is looking pretty good, but I was hoping she could leave the south altogether. Living Blue in a Red state isn’t unbearably awful, but why not at least look for a more hospitable area where like minded individuals are easier to find.

Charlotte-direct-flights

Image from: http://charlotteusa.com/business-info/transportation/

As I’ve been searching for locations with large airport hubs, I have also been checking the climate of each location, as well as the likelihood of natural disasters. After all, if you’re flying in and out of town each week, you don’t want to deal with iced planes and other dangerous situations.

One thing i have realized during this quest, is that there are places with much better climates than the one I was born to. Then I wondered why more people don’t relocate to areas where the climate is more suitable to their personal disposition.

Some people love snow, some love rain, some must live near water, some wish to view mountains every day… and yet, far too many Americans remain where they were born, settling. Whatever happened to the pioneer spirit?

Where we live should be a subject of at least some consideration. For instance, I discovered that I loved living in Arizona. The dry climate did wonders for my allergies and I had absolutely no hives during the five years I lived there.

Here’s another little tidbit that helped me rule out some states…

The top 10 states for tornadoes as of the most recent (1991-2015) average are as follows, in order from high to low: Texas, Kansas, Oklahoma, Florida, Nebraska, Illinois, Colorado, Iowa, Alabama, Missouri, and Mississippi.

The US experiences more than 1,000 tornadoes a year, and the storms have been reported on every continent except Antarctica.

 

tornado

 

I’ll be posting more of my results for easy access and for future reference as I search for a suitable suburb in a metropolitan area within 30 – 45 minutes of a large airport hub offering direct flights across the country.

Feel free to make recommendations.

 

 

 

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